The color of a wine derives from the grape skin or rather from some substances that are found in the skins and that are released during the maceration phase. That is, in the period in which the skins remain in contact with the monster after racking.

In order to simplify, the longer the skins are left in contact with the must, the more colorful the finished wine will be.

For example, many rosés are obtained simply by reducing the contact between the skins and the must to a few hours.

Having said this, we must also consider that not all grapes are the same and that some vines have a greater coloring power than others.

Merlot, Cabernet or Nero d’Avola, just to give two examples, are grapes that give a lot of color.

On the contrary, Nebbiolo and Pinot Nero are naturally less dyes and even after a very long maceration, the wine obtained will never be too full of color.

Finally, other grapes, having a white skin, do not yield any color. This is the case of Chardonnay or Vermentino. From these vines it will never be possible to obtain a rosé wine nor a red one.

Beyond these technical explanations, the evaluation of the color of a wine allows the sommelier to obtain some information before moving on to the actual tasting.

Let’s take some examples:

We evaluate the color of a wine

  • Younger and fresher white wines, those that are usually put on the market only a few months after the harvest and which, generally, should be drunk within the year, have a lighter and colder yellow color.

With greenish or straw reflections. The longer the processing in the cellar, the warmer the color of the wine.

  • Analyzing the color of a red wine, care must be taken not to be impressed by the intensity of the color itself.

As we mentioned earlier, in fact, there are grapes that hardly give life to very colorful wines, even if they undergo long maceration. Having said that, the freshest and youngest wines usually have more intense colors ranging from ruby ​​to purplish.

On the other hand, when you are faced with a wine that has already undergone some aging in the cellar, the color will be less bright and the purple reflections will become more tending towards garnet. Full maturity or the first signs of old age are manifested by orange reflections gradually more evident.

 

Beyond these technical explanations, the evaluation of the color of a wine allows the sommelier to obtain some information before moving on to the actual tasting.

Let’s take some examples:

We evaluate the color of a wine

  • Younger and fresher white wines, those that are usually put on the market only a few months after the harvest and which, generally, should be drunk within the year, have a lighter and colder yellow color.

With greenish or straw reflections. The longer the processing in the cellar, the warmer the color of the wine.

  • Analyzing the color of a red wine, care must be taken not to be impressed by the intensity of the color itself.

As we mentioned earlier, in fact, there are grapes that hardly give life to very colorful wines, even if they undergo long maceration. Having said that, the freshest and youngest wines usually have more intense colors ranging from ruby ​​to purplish.

On the other hand, when you are faced with a wine that has already undergone some aging in the cellar, the color will be less bright and the purple reflections will become more tending towards garnet. Full maturity or the first signs of old age are manifested by orange reflections gradually more evident.

Be careful though that we are only talking about nuances.

900 Wine

900 Wine

900 brand represents the essence of “Made in Italy”, a perfect combination of taste and design created to become a reference point in the oenological field.